High Precision Linear Guides

CHTR linear guide rail keep the high precision under the high technology position, the different precision has wide application.
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Product Details

Precision is the technical standard to proof a manufacturer, our high precision suitable for high precision equipment, there will be no deviation or slipping phenomenon when it makes linear guide run.

High precision linear guideway is produced by high precision special plane which can polyhedral grind at the same time, detected by laser and other advanced process.

Linear guides are mainly used in mechanical structures with high precision requirements, such as grinding machines, lathes, industrial automation machines, semiconductor machinery, packaging machines, etc.

TRHG25B+TRHG25A组合

Model

M

W

L

B

C

S

W1

W2

M1

F

TRH15B

28

34

61.8

26

26

M4×0.7×5

15

9.5

15

60

TRH20B

30

44

77.4

32

36

M5×0.8×6

20

12

18

60

TRH20BL

30

44

93.4

32

50

M5×0.8×6

20

12

18

60

TRH25B

40

48

83.5

35

35

M6×8

23

12.5

22

60

TRH25BL

40

48

102.6

35

50

M6×8

23

12.5

22

60

TRH30B

45

60

100.5

40

40

M8×10

28

16

26

80

TRH30BL

45

60

123

40

60

M8×10

28

16

26

80

TRH35B

55

70

113.9

50

50

M8×12

34

18

29

80

TRH35BL

55

70

139.2

50

72

M8×12

34

18

29

80

TRH45B

70

86

138.5

60

60

M10×17

45

20.5

38

105

TRH45BL

70

86

169.5

60

80

M10×17

45

20.5

38

105

TRH55B

80

100

163

75

75

M12×18

53

23.5

44

120

TRH55BL

80

100

201

75

95

M12×18

53

23.5

44

120


Data unit is mm

工厂图




Fluid lubrication results in a full-film or a boundary condition lubrication mode. A properly designed bearing system reduces friction by eliminating surface-to-surface contact between the journal and bearing through 

Fluid lubrication results in a full-film or a boundary condition lubrication mode. A properly designed bearing system reduces friction by eliminating surface-to-surface contact between the journal and bearing through fluid dynamic effects.

Fluid bearings can be hydrostatically or hydrodynamically lubricated. Hydrostatically lubricated bearings are lubricated by an external pump that maintains a static amount of pressure. In a hydrodynamic bearing the pressure in the oil film is maintained by the rotation of the journal. Hydrostatic bearings enter a hydrodynamic state when the journal is rotating.[11] Hydrostatic bearings usually use oil, while hydrodynamic bearings can use oil or grease, however bearings can be designed to use whatever fluid is available, and several pump designs use the pumped fluid as a lubricant.[33]

Hydrodynamic bearings require greater care in design and operation than hydrostatic bearings. They are also more prone to initial wear because lubrication does not occur until there is rotation of the shaft. At low rotational speeds the lubrication may not attain complete separation between shaft and bushing. As a result, hydrodynamic bearings may be aided by secondary bearings that support the shaft during start and stop periods, protecting the fine tolerance machined surfaces of the journal bearing. On the other hand, hydrodynamic bearings are simpler to install and are less expensive.[citation needed]

In the hydrodynamic state a lubrication "wedge" forms, which lifts the journal. The journal also slightly shifts horizontally in the direction of rotation. The location of the journal is measured by the attitude angle, which is the angle formed between the vertical and a line that crosses through the center of the journal and the center of the bearing, and the eccentricity ratio, which is the ratio of the distance of the centre of the journal from the centre of the bearing, to the overall radial clearance. The attitude angle and eccentricity ratio are dependent on the direction and speed of rotation and the load. In hydrostatic bearings the oil pressure also affects the eccentricity ratio. In electromagnetic equipment like motors, electromagnetic forces can counteract gravity loads, causing the journal to take up unusual positions.[11]

One disadvantage specific to fluid-lubricated, hydrodynamic journal bearings in high-speed machinery is oil whirl—a self-excited vibration of the journal. Oil whirl occurs when the lubrication wedge becomes unstable: small disturbances of the journal result in reaction forces from the oil film, which cause further movement, causing both the oil film and the journal to "whirl" around the bearing shell. Typically the whirl frequency is around 42% of the journal turning speed. In extreme cases oil whirl leads to direct contact between the journal and the bearing, which quickly wears out the bearing. In some cases the frequency of the whirl coincides with and "locks on to" the critical speed of the machine shaft; this condition is known as "oil whip". Oil whip can be very destructive


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